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Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy

Last Updated: June 12, 2023

Your privacy is very important to us. This privacy policy explains the privacy practices for Joint Venture Silicon Valley and its websites: jointventure.org, siliconvalleyindicators.org, siliconvalleyonline.org, and grandboulevard.net. This privacy notice applies solely to information collected by these websites, except where stated otherwise. It will notify you of the following:

  • What information we collect
  • With whom it is shared
  • How it can be corrected
  • How it is secured
  • How policy changes will be communicated
  • How to address concerns over misuse of personal data

Information collection, use, and sharing

We are the sole owners of the information collected on this site. We only have access to/collect information that you voluntarily give us via email, online website forms, or other direct contact from you. We will not sell or rent this information to anyone.

We will use your information to respond to you, regarding the reason you contacted us. We will not share your information with any third party outside of our organization, other than as necessary to fulfill your request (For example, we use MailChimp to send out our email communications.)

Unless you ask us not to, we may contact you via email in the future to tell you about events, other pertinent information about our work, or changes to this privacy policy.

Your access to and control over information

You can do the following at any time by contacting us via the email address or phone number provided on our website:

  • See what data we have about you, if any
  • Change/correct any data we have about you
  • Have us delete any data we have about you
  • Express any concern you have about our use of your data

If you prefer not to receive electronic promotional communications from us, you can opt-out at any time by following the Unsubscribe instructions included in each email communication. Please note that changes may not be effective immediately. In each event, you must clearly indicate the information that you wish to have changed, or clearly indicate that you wish to have your personally identifiable information removed from our database. We will endeavor to comply with your request as soon as reasonably possible.

Registration

In order to attend one of our events, a user must first complete the registration form either on our website (jointventure.org) or via a third-party registration system such as Eventbrite. During registration a user is required to give certain information (such as name and email address). This information is used to contact you about the details of the event in which you have expressed interest.

Sharing

We partner with another party to provide specific services (For example, we use MailChimp to send out our email communications.). When the user signs up for these services, we will share names, or other contact information that is necessary for the third party to provide these services. These parties are not allowed to use personally identifiable information except for the purpose of providing these services.

Security

We take precautions to protect your information. When you submit sensitive information via the website, your information is protected both online and offline.

Wherever we collect sensitive information (such as credit card data), that information is encrypted and transmitted to us in a secure way. You can verify this by looking for a closed lock icon next to the website URL in your web browser or looking for "https" at the beginning of the address of the web page.

While we use encryption to protect sensitive information transmitted online, we also protect your information offline. Only employees who need the information to perform a specific job (e.g. billing or customer service) are granted access to personally identifiable information. The computers/servers on which we store personally identifiable information are kept in a secure environment.

Cookies

We use "cookies" on our sites. A cookie is a small piece of data sent from a website and stored on the user's computer by the user's web browser while the user is browsing. Cookies help us improve your access to our site and identify repeat visitors to our site. For instance, when we use a cookie to identify you, you would not have to log in more than once, thereby saving time while on our site. Cookies can also enable us to track and target the interests of our users to enhance their experience on our site. Usage of a cookie is in no way linked to any personally identifiable information on our site.

Links

Our websites contain links to other sites. Please be aware that we are not responsible for the content or privacy practices of such other sites. We encourage our users to be aware when they leave our site and to read the privacy statements of any other site that collects personally identifiable information.

Surveys

In order to download some of our free reports, our site requests information via surveys. Participation in these surveys is completely voluntary and you may choose whether or not to participate and therefore disclose this information. Information requested may include, but is not limited to, contact information (such as name and email address), and demographic information (such as zip/postal code and geographic region). Survey information will be used for purposes of determining who is downloading the report which will help us make reports more useful and relevant to readers in the future.

California “Do Not Track” disclosures

The California Online Privacy Protection Act (CalOPPA) requires websites to disclose their tracking policies to users.

Do Not Track (also referred to as DNT) is a web browser preference a user can activate (if the web browser supports it) that tells the web browser not to track the browsing activities of an individual user.

At this time, we only respond to browser DNT signals in regards to Google Analytics and only on jointventure.org. Our other three websites do not respond to DNT signals. If you have activated Do Not Track on your web browser, jointventure.org will tell Google Analytics to cease tracking your browsing activity. We cannot, however, guarantee that third parties that have content embedded on our site, such as social plug-ins, will respond to your Do Not Track request.

Learn more about Do Not Track.

LinkedIn conversion tracking and Insight Tag

The LinkedIn Insight Tag is a piece of lightweight JavaScript code that we have added to our website (jointventure.org) to enable in-depth campaign reporting and to unlock valuable insights about our website visitors. We use the LinkedIn Insight Tag to track conversions, retarget website visitors, and unlock additional insights about members interacting with our LinkedIn ads.

The LinkedIn Insight Tag enables the collection of data regarding members’ visits to our website (jointventure.org), including the URL, referrer, IP address, device and browser characteristics (User Agent), and timestamp. The IP addresses are encrypted and LinkedIn doesn't share the personal data of members with us; they only provide reports and alerts (which do not identify members) about our website audience and ad performance. They also provide retargeting for website visitors, enabling us to show personalized ads off our website by using this data, but without identifying the member. We also use data that doesn't identify members to improve ad relevance and reach members across devices. LinkedIn members can control the use of their personal data for advertising purposes through their account settings.

We recommend you read LinkedIn’s Cookie Policy for more information.

Google Analytics granular location and device data

By default, Google Analytics collects metadata about the city-level location and granular device details of jointventure.org and siliconvalleyindicators.org. This data includes:

  • City
  • Latitude (of city)
  • Longitude (of city)
  • Browser minor version
  • Browser User-Agent string
  • Device brand
  • Device model
  • Device name
  • Operating system minor version
  • Platform minor version
  • Screen resolution

Google Analytics collects this info so it can provide location and device-based capabilities to website visitors.

California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA)

The new California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) of 2018 went into effect on January 1, 2020. Although most nonprofits (including Joint Venture Silicon Valley) are not subject to this law, we felt it was important to include some basic information about this law in our privacy policy. We want to assure you that, although we are not subject to this law, we take issues of privacy very seriously and have therefore always followed the four principles of this act (listed below) when handling your personal information.

The CCPA provides consumers with four basic rights relating to their personal information:

  • The Right to Know
  • The Right to Opt Out
  • The Right to Control and Be Forgotten
  • The Right to Exercise Privacy Rights Without Prejudice

Notification of changes

Occasionally, we may need to update this Privacy Policy. The date the Privacy Policy was most recently updated is always listed at the top of this document. If we are going to use any personal information in a manner that is materially different from that stated in our Privacy Policy at the time we collected such information, we will give you a reasonable opportunity to consent to the change. If you do not consent, your personal information will be used as agreed to under the terms of the privacy policy in effect at the time we obtained that information. We will use information previously obtained in accordance with the privacy policy in effect when the information was obtained from you.

Changes made in our most recent update:

  • Updated our phone number and mailing address
  • Added section: “Google Analytics granular location and device data”

How to contact us about a privacy policy concern

If you feel that we are not abiding by this privacy policy, you should contact us immediately via telephone at +1 (408) 577-2255 or email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Questions and comments

If you have questions about our privacy policy, please email us at
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Or write to us at:
Joint Venture Silicon Valley
ATTN: Communications and Marketing, Privacy Policy
P.O. Box 720010
San Jose, California 95172 USA

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the Grand Boulevard Initiative?

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative benefit our communities?

What is the El Camino Real "Corridor"?

Why El Camino Real?

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative help communities maintain their unique identities?

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative benefit the environment?

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative impact our local economy?

How does the Grand Boulevard Initiative work?

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative projects affect traffic along El Camino Real?

How will new housing development affect traffic and congestion?

What has the Grand Boulevard Initiative accomplished so far?

How are Grand Boulevard Initiative projects funded?

Why does the Grand Boulevard Initiative aim to develop additional housing in Peninsula communities, and how will new housing development affect people who already live here?

 

What is the Grand Boulevard Initiative?

The Grand Boulevard Initiative supports work to make El Camino more friendly to the people who live and work along it, from Daly City to San Jose. The Grand Boulevard Initiative aims to help El Camino Real match the creativity and high quality of life that Peninsula communities are so proud of.

We are creating people friendly places, through projects like safer sidewalks and crosswalks, parks and green spaces, improved transportation options, and reasonably-priced home and apartment development. The Grand Boulevard Initiative is working to create beautiful and accessible destinations along El Camino Real, so it can be a place people come to enjoy, rather than just a highway.

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative benefit our communities?

The Grand Boulevard Initiative supports work to make the El Camino corridor more friendly to the people who live and work here: Parents. Kids. Commuters. Homeowners. Local businesses.

El Camino improvements are making it safer and easier for people to walk and bike to school or the store, easier for people to get to and from work and easier for people to live close to where they work and play. And as communities add new shops, restaurants and parks along El Camino Real, it’s becoming a destination full of places to see and explore—not just a thruway.

Projects we support will help Peninsula residents and visitors commute without sitting in gridlocked traffic, walk to restaurants, shop locally, and enjoy all our communities have to offer.

Learn more and get involved.

What is the El Camino Real "Corridor"?

The "El Camino Real Corridor" includes the 43-mile stretch of the El Camino Real roadway between Daly City and downtown San Jose as well as the ½-mile area of surrounding streets and neighborhoods on either side of the roadway.

Why El Camino Real?

The Peninsula is like no place on earth. Our positive spirit is matched by a high quality of life. But the El Camino Real does not currently live up to those standards—it is sorely out of date. El Camino Real was built a hundred years ago to be a thruway, first for wagons and later cars. Today, even though it passes through the heart of so many Peninsula communities, El Camino is pretty inhospitable to people. We are changing that. The Grand Boulevard Initiative will help make more of what our communities need and love: vibrant neighborhoods, a thriving business community, and a strong system of public transportation.

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative help communities maintain their unique identities?

It is up to each individual city to implement the Grand Boulevard Initiative in the ways that best serve their community. According to local needs, projects will vary. Each of the 19 cities along El Camino Real adopted its own plan with input from community members. Project decisions are all made locally, even though the guiding vision—of people friendly places—serves as the common spirit behind each city’s effort.

As important as any other goal of the Grand Boulevard initiative is the effort to help communities draw on what they are already proud of, so that the unique local flavor of each community can continue to stand out. The Grand Boulevard Initiative aims to help the bright spots in each community shine even brighter, while creating new points of pride for the future.

How will Grand Boulevard Initiative benefit the environment?

People friendly places are healthier places for many reasons, including helping people be more active, as well as improving air quality. When people can easily get around on foot, bike or bus, they'll rely less on their cars. Fewer cars on the road mean cleaner air and reduced emissions. Greater access to the new parks and green spaces means that kids, parents, residents and pet owners will have more attractive, convenient places to enjoy fresh air and sunshine. 

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative impact our local economy?

People friendly places mean a more prosperous future for our communities. The kinds of walkable and bike-friendly communities that the Grand Boulevard Initiative supports will result in a stronger customer base for local businesses, increased access to businesses, as well as a stronger pool of employees who will be able to live and shop locally. People friendly communities near big companies will make it easier to recruit top talent and reduce job turnover.

Walkable and bike-friendly neighborhoods near businesses, restaurants, and green spaces are great for home values in our communities.

Plus, new consumer and tax money means more resources for community improvement. Reducing sprawl also has the benefit of reducing the need to build costly new infrastructure—consider the costs and long term benefits of a massive highway overpass lane addition project, versus a new apartment community near an existing train station.

How does the Grand Boulevard Initiative work?

The Grand Boulevard Initiative is a team effort. Our team includes local government leaders, business groups, and nonprofit organizations dedicated to making the El Camino corridor more people friendly. Everyone involved in the initiative participates on a voluntary basis.

The Grand Boulevard Task Force is the main policy-making body for the Initiative. The Task Force is made up of elected officials from each city and county along the roadway, developers, private businesses, labor groups, and representatives of government agencies like transit and regional planning agencies. The leaders of our Task Force are the General Manager of the San Mateo County Transit District and the president of Joint Venture Silicon Valley Network. The Grand Boulevard is a voluntary coalition, not a legal entity. All decision-making rests with member organizations (individual cities, counties, and other participating government agencies). The Grand Boulevard Initiative is not a top-down organization—action happens on the local level.

How will the Grand Boulevard Initiative projects affect traffic along El Camino Real?

Traffic is a real problem, but as the Grand Boulevard Initiative vision continues to come to life, the burden of traffic on El Camino Real will reduce. Right now, El Camino Real is very car-centric, mostly out of necessity for the people who live and work along it. People drive because it is convenient, and because other options (like public transportation, walking, or biking) are either unsafe or inaccessible.

As more Grand Boulevard Initiative projects are implemented, biking and walking will become safer options, and public transportation will become faster and more convenient. Once walking, biking, and public transportation are safe and easy options for residents and commuters who are looking for alternatives to driving, we’ll see fewer cars on the road, less congestion, and cleaner air (especially during peak traffic times).

How will new housing development affect traffic and congestion?

In Peninsula communities, lack of reasonably-priced housing options is a major issue that has led to increased local and regional traffic congestion and reduced air quality.

Grand Boulevard Initiative projects are working to make it easier for people to live closer to the places they work. Nobody wants a long commute, but right now most people who live in the Peninsula are forced to commute (mostly by car) to other places in order to work, and most people employed in Peninsula communities have to commute in from other places.

The Grand Boulevard Initiative aims to help create more local jobs, as well as develop reasonably-priced housing options, so that the teachers, librarians, restaurant hosts, and clothing store attendants we interact with every day are able to call these communities home as well. With more reasonably priced housing options close by, and new job opportunities at thriving local businesses, we can gradually reduce commute times and traffic congestion.

New home and apartment developments will have easy access to transportation, helping reduce commute times and keep cars off the roads, resulting in cleaner air and a more sustainable future for our children.

What has the Grand Boulevard Initiative accomplished so far?

While the Grand Boulevard Initiative is a long term, incremental project that will be implemented city-by city, a number of Grand Boulevard Initiative-supported projects have already been completed. These projects include access and safety improvements on El Camino Real and surrounding cross streets, the development of new homes and jobs near existing public transportation, and improved transit services.

In South San Francisco, a string of vacant lots were transformed into a bike and pedestrian pathway connecting schools, parks and neighborhoods, and public transportation throughout the city (Centennial Way). In Daly City, War Memorial Community Center on Mission Street was expanded to include a new library, gymnasiums, offices, and open space.

Within walking distance of the Caltrain station in Millbrae, the community now has a brand new condo development. With shops and restaurants at street level, underground parking, and paths and benches for pedestrians, it’s a beautiful addition to the neighborhood that’s letting people live closer to their jobs and transportation options.

In Palo Alto, a streetscape improvement project helped the intersection of El Camino Real and Stanford Avenue become safer, more accessible, and more beautiful.

Many of the improvements that cities and communities are working on are big and cannot happen overnight. But we can all do our part to make our communities more people friendly. Talk to your local city council representatives to show your support for El Camino Real Corridor improvement projects that are already happening in your city, and share your ideas for a more people friendly future. By showing your support for projects like new parks, improved sidewalks, and safer bike paths, you can help drive positive change in your own community.

Visit our Activity Along the Corridor page to learn more about improvements happening near you: http://www.grandboulevard.net/community/ 

How are Grand Boulevard Initiative projects funded?

The Grand Boulevard Initiative is funded by various federal, state, local, and private grant programs and foundations. As of September 2014, the Grand Boulevard Initiative has secured $8.7 million in grant funding from programs and agencies such as the U.S. Department of Transportation TIGER II Grant Program, the California Department of Transportation, the Metropolitan Transportation Commission Climate Initiative Program, and the Silicon Valley Community Foundation. Local funding also is provided by the San Mateo County Transit District, which covers administrative expenses, and from the City/County Association of Governments of San Mateo County and the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, which provide the local matching fund requirements for the current grant work.

Many projects that are not directly funded by the Grand Boulevard Initiative are also a part of the effort, because the cities and towns along the Corridor have committed to encourage private development projects to be designed with people friendly places in mind. The tips and guidelines that cities have signed on to support are called the Grad Boulevard Initiative Guiding Principles. Any project along the Corridor that supports people friendly places can be a part of the Grand Boulevard initiative, even if it is funded by a city, local government, or private developer.

Why does the Grand Boulevard Initiative aim to develop additional housing in Peninsula communities, and how will new housing development affect people who already live here?

In Peninsula communities, lack of reasonably-priced housing options is a major issue that has led to increased local and regional traffic congestion and reduced air quality. Most people who live in the Peninsula are forced to commute (mostly by car) to other places in order to work, and most people employed in Peninsula communities have to commute in from other places. The Grand Boulevard Initiative aims to help create more local jobs, as well as develop reasonably-priced housing options, so that the teachers, librarians, restaurant hosts, and clothing store attendants  we interact with every day are able to call these communities home as well. New home and apartment development will be easily transit accessible, helping reduce commute times and keep cars off the roads, resulting in cleaner air and a more sustainable future for our children.

For residents and homeowners, walkable access to shopping, entertainment, and necessities will increase property values, improve lifestyle, as well as create safer opportunities for current residents to age in place.

 

Guiding Principles

The Grand Boulevard Guiding Principles have been adopted by the Task Force as well as a number of member agencies. The Guiding Principles define the GBI vision, that "El Camino Real will achieve its full potential for residents to work, live, shop, and play, creating links between communities that promote walking and transit and an improved and meaningful quality of life." Following each of the Guiding Principles is a non-exhaustive list of potential strategies.

To learn more about the Grand Boulevard Initiative Vision and Challenge, click here.  To download a complete PDF of the Grand Boulevard Initiative Vision, Challenge, and Guiding Principles, click here.

1. Target housing and job growth in strategic areas along the corridor

  • Amend General Plans and implement zoning and Specific Plans that facilitate increases in density, particularly around transit stations and key intersections.
  • In accordance with city goals, encourage more housing and business opportunities, with a greater range of affordability and choices, exemplifying high-quality architecture and urban design.
  • Preserve significant buildings.
  • Provide a system of local and corridor-wide incentives to attract private development and economic investment along the corridor.

2. Encourage compact mixed-use development and high-quality urban design and construction

  • Develop design guidelines to assist in the attainment of the Grand Boulevard vision and challenge statements.
  • Accommodate housing.
  • Implement zoning and precise plans with design-specific elements that address street orientation, facades, parking and setbacks
  • Provide planning aides and design guidelines, such as the Community Design and Transportation Manual, to developers

3. Create a pedestrian-oriented environment and improve streetscapes, ensuring full access to and between public areas and private developments

  • Provide an integrated pedestrian environment with wide, continuous sidewalks, landscaping, lighting, and signage, all with human-scale details, with a commitment to maintain those amenities. Such amenities should conform to Caltrans standards.
  • Continuously clean and maintain the Grand Boulevard streetscape and public spaces.
  • Preserve sightlines between activity areas.
  • Create landmarks and signature buildings to shape the street environment to a pedestrian orientation.
  • Repair barriers between activity areas such as discontinuous sidewalks.
  • Reduce street crossing distances where appropriate.

4. Develop a balanced multimodal corridor to maintain and improve mobility of people and vehicles along the corridor

  • Support transit-oriented development (TOD) and increased density around station areas.
  • Orient buildings toward transit stops.
  • Design transit stops for easy passenger loading, unloading and fare payment.
  • Improve signal timing.
  • Implement transit-preferential street treatments such as signal priority, bulb out stops, bus by-pass lanes and high occupancy vehicle (HOV)/Bus-only lanes where needed and feasible.
  • Implement programs designed to reduce auto trips during congestion periods.

5. Manage Parking Assets

  • Consider trip reduction due to transit when designing parking requirements.
  • Pursue the development of public/public and public/private partnerships to develop multiuse parking structures in strategic locations along the corridor.
  • Consider shared parking facilities (I.e. for business during the day, restaurants at night).
  • Consider the trade-offs between TOD and parking at rail stations.
  • Preserve street frontage for active uses by placing parking behind buildings.
  • Develop and use a network of alleys to access parking and limit vehicular crossings of sidewalks.
  • Where appropriate, install parking meters or time-limited parking spaces to encourage turnover.
  • Review parking requirements when considering new developments, possibly substituting reliance on Transportation Demand Management (TDM) strategies and reducing required parking.

6. Provide vibrant public spaces and gathering places

  • Create public spaces of all sizes that will stand the test of time and provide lasting value for future generations.
  • Design public areas to attract usage.
  • Orient new development around existing or new gathering places and transit stations.
  • Design public spaces to be functional as well as decorative through the careful use of space and amenities.
  • Encourage the development of small public spaces and pocket parks.

7. Preserve and accentuate unique and desirable community character and the existing quality of life in adjacent neighborhoods

  • Encourage design that is compatible with or shares design elements with adjacent development and neighborhoods.
  • Identify local themes and express them through landscape, architecture and urban design guidelines.
  • Preserve diverse local small businesses and create economic opportunities for their continued presence in the revitalized corridor.

8. Improve safety and public health

  • Design intersections for a balance between the needs of autos and pedestrians.
  • Design parallel access routes where needed to separate pedestrian and bike movements.
  • Provide high-quality pedestrian amenities such as distinct crosswalks, countdown signals and curb ramps.
  • Ensure adequate public and private facilities for disabled individuals.

9. Strengthen pedestrian and bicycle connections with the corridor

  • Reduce the distance between corridor crossings to improve connectivity with adjacent neighborhoods where appropriate.
  • For projects near the corridor, encourage design that provides easy access to the corridor or to cross streets.
  • Provide pedestrian cut-through linkages to access parking lots, alleys and neighborhood routes between blocks, including additions to “Safe Route to Schools” paths.

10. Pursue environmentally sustainable and economically viable development patterns

  • Provide incentives for LEED (leadership in energy and environmental design) certified projects.
  • Pursue design, engineering and construction techniques that assist with the management of storm water runoff, preserve (and possibly increase) soil permeability, and reduce heat island and other negative effects of urban development.
  • Pursue cross-jurisdictional shared revenue projects, such as parking structures, that provide mutual benefits to all partners.
  • Provide a system of local and corridor-wide incentives to attract private development and economic investment along the corridor.

Contact Us

If you want additional information about the Grand Boulevard Initiative, please contact Millie Tolleson at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

 

Working Committee Roster

The Working Committee is comprised of representatives from government agency GBI members, which conducts research and makes recommendations to the Task Force. The Working Committee welcomes the attendance and input from interested groups.

Working Committee Chair:
Michael Garvey, CGS
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Working Committee Vice-Chair:
Lindy Chan, Redwood City
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Working Committee:

Gillian Adams Bay Area Metro - ABAG This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Jon Biggs City of Los Altos This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
April Chan SamTrans This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Angela Chavez San Mateo County This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lisa Costa Sanders Town of Atherton This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Liz Cullinan Town of Hillsborough This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
John Davidson City of Santa Clara This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Carlos de Melo City of Belmont This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Sam Fielding City of Millbrae This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Becky Frank Caltrans - District 4 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Kevin Gardiner City of Burlingame This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Suzy Kalkin San Mateo City/County Association of Governments This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Julia Klein City of San Mateo This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Michael Laughlin Town of Colma This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Anna McGill City of Santa Clara This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Chitra Moitra City of Palo Alto This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Doug Moody City of San Jose This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Mark Muenzer City of Menlo Park This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Brent Pearse Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Krisha Penollar City of Mountain View This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Lisa Porras City of San Carlos This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Mark Sullivan City of San Bruno This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Therese Trivedi Bay Area Metro - MTC This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Michael van Lonkhuysen City of Daly City This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Ryan Wassum City of South San Francisco This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Amber Blizinski City of Sunnyvale This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

 


 

Grand Boulevard Task Force

The Task Force is comprised of policy makers from the public and private sector. The Task Force will make the final decisions on all matters.

Task Force Chairs:

Russell Hancock, Joint Venture Silicon Valley
Jim Hartnett, San Mateo County Transit District

Task Force Members:

Shiloh Ballard,Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition
Emily Beach, City of Burlingame
Sweta Bhatnagar, Stanford University
Elaine Breeze, SAMCEDA and Summer Hill Apartment Communities
Dev Davis, City of San Jose
Steve Dostart, Dostart Development Company, LLC
Marci Dragun, San Mateo County Board of Supervisors
Tom DuBois, City of Palo Alto
Nuria Fernandez, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority
Jean Finney, California Department of Transportation District 4
Neysa Fligor, City of Los Altos
Rosanne Foust, San Mateo County Economic Development Association
Maureen Freschet, City of San Mateo
Rich Garbarino, City of South San Francisco
Michael Goldman, City of Sunnyvale
John Goodwin, Town of Colma
Alison Hicks , City of Mountain View
Ken Kirkey, Metropolitan Transportation Commission
Michael Lempres
,Town of Atherton
Patricia Mahan, City of Santa Clara
Shireen Malekafzali, San Mateo County Health System
Juslyn Manalo, City of Daly City
Shelly Masur, City of Redwood City
Nevada Merriman, MidPen Housing Corporation 
Maryann Moise Derwin, City/County Association of Governments Board of Directors
Geoffrey Morgan, First Community Housing
Betsy Nash, City of Menlo Park
Mark Olbert, City of San Carlos
Josh Powell, San Mateo County Transit District, Board of Directors
Alvin Royse, Town of Hillsborough
James Ruigomez, San Mateo County Building & Construction Trades Council
Ann Schneider, City of Millbrae
Maureen Sedonaen, Habitat for Humanity - Greater San Francisco
Chi-Hwa Shao, CHS Development Group, Inc.
Jeff Smith, Sares Regis Group of Northern California
Lydia Tan, Bentall Kennedy
Helen Wolter, Committee for Green Foothills
Sandy Wong, City/County Association of Governments of San Mateo County
Ken Yeager, Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors
Rotating Member
, City of Belmont
Vacant, Central Trades Council, Santa Clara County
Vacant, Santa Clara County Health Department
Vacant,City of San Bruno
Vacant, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority, Board of Directors

Task Force Alternates:

Chris Augenstein, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority
Duane Bay
, Bay Area Metro 
Rick Bonilla, City of San Mateo
Michael Brownrigg, 
City of Burlingame
Jeannie Bruins, City of Los Altos
Marie Chuang, Town of Hillborough
Chris Dehaan, Sares Regis Group of Northern California
Adrian Fine, City of Palo Alto 
Ina Gerhard
, California Department of Transportation District 4
Rae Gonzalez, Town of Colma
Michael Guingona, City of Daly City
Mark Haesloop, CHS Development Group, Inc.
Diane Howard, City of Redwood City
Cameron Johnson, City of San Carlos
Kieran Kelly, Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors
Elizabeth Lewis, Town of Atherton 
Lisa Matichak, City of Mountain View
Brian Oh, San Mateo County Health System
Drew Combs, City of Menlo Park
Emma Shlaes, Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition
Nancy Smith, City of Sunnyvale
Kathy Watanabe, City of Santa Clara

 

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